Abstract/Description

Pair programming is an important technique for developing higher quality code, faster while also reducing risk and spreading knowledge in an organization. With pair programming, two software developers work on one computer, collaborating on the same design, algorithm, code, or test. Since the popularization of the practice almost 20 years ago, some organizations have adopted the practice wholeheartedly ("extreme pairing"), others use the practice in certain situations ("on-demand pairing"), and many others still fear the practice will double their development costs. This session will share pair programming research results and anecdotal experiences of programmers who have transitioned to pair programming and best practices in pair programming for obtaining the most benefit for an organization.

Additional Resources

About the Speaker(s)

Laurie Williams is the Interim Department Head of Computer Science and a Professor in the Computer Science Department of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University (NCSU). Laurie is a co-director of the NCSU Science of Security Lablet. Laurie's research focuses on software security; agile, lean, and continuous deployment software development practices and processes; software reliability, software testing and analysis; and broadening participation and increasing retention in computer science. Laurie has more than 210 refereed publications. Laurie received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Utah, her MBA from Duke University Fuqua School of Business, and her BS in Industrial Engineering from Lehigh University. She worked for IBM Corporation for nine years in Raleigh, NC and Research Triangle Park, NC before returning to academia. Laurie received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Utah, her MBA from Duke University Fuqua School of Business, and her BS in Industrial Engineering from Lehigh University. She worked for IBM Corporation for nine years in Raleigh, NC and Research Triangle Park, NC before returning to academia.