Abstract/Description

Your delivery team may be focused on continuously tuning their CI/CD pipeline but who is focusing on the business pipeline?

If your delivery team is not always producing new functionality at the rate you want, the bottleneck might not be in the way they’re working. Imagine a software development factory that can’t get the raw materials it needs in time to keep production humming.

The Theory of Constraints (ToC) adopts the idiom of “a chain is no stronger than its weakest link”. Delivery teams need the right requirements (chunks of work) at the right time.

“What?” you say. “I’m already working as hard as I can to provide them with complete requirements specifications.” I believe you. Salah and George can help you notice some issues that might have escaped your attention. And they can help you address those issues in ways that may save you some work.

Questions that may be helpful to consider are:
* What makes it so challenging to provide the information the delivery team needs at the time they need it?
* What causes our business pipeline to be broken? In manufacturing, identifying bottlenecks may be obvious but what about knowledge work?!
* What’s hidden that could cause delays and create a state of learned helplessness?

This presentation will explore the challenges that stems from the discovery and explore ideas to consider for building a healthy business pipeline. At the end of this session, you will be able to identify the bottlenecks using the drum buffer rope and learn about the 3 amigos and clarification through examples (acceptance scenarios) and techniques to alleviate the bottlenecks.

Additional Resources

About the Speaker(s)

George Dinwiddie helps organizations develop software more effectively. He brings thirty-five years of development experience from electronic hardware and embedded firmware to business information technology. He helps organizations, managers, and teams solve the problems they face by providing consulting, coaching, mentoring and training at the organizational, process, team, interpersonal, and technical levels. Involved in the Agile community since 2000, he has helped groups ranging from 8 developers to a Fortune 100 company and a billion-plus dollar federal program. He is a frequent presenter at conferences such as the Agile Conference, Agile Development Practices, Agile Testing Days and numerous regional and focused conferences, and has been published in print and on-line magazines.

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