AATC2017: Invest in Yourself This Year

Added to The Alliance

You can get a master's degree from a great university without ever stepping foot on campus. I did, thanks to the University of Colorado's great distance program for engineering. You can jump online and learn anything about technology through providers like Pluralsight or Lynda. I do that all the time. And you can consume superb tech presentations anytime at places like InfoQ.com. I watch a few every week. What's the problem? On top of these great on-demand assets that we consume in bits, you need dedicated time to soak up knowledge. As you attempt to evolve your Agile engineering practices to match the latest tools and techniques, there's no better place to do that than the Agile Alliance Technical Conference 2017 (AATC2017).

No doubt, there are a LOT of technology conferences out there. That's fantastic, and reflects the reality that software is impacting every industry. Why should AATC be part of your 2017 investment in a smarter you? I can think of four reasons:

  1. Comprehensive coverage of timely topics. Good software requires more than good coding. Yes, we want to use the latest reactive framework and craft comprehensive tests. But it's also critical to have an adaptable architecture, ubiquitous automation, and a focus on sustainable ops. This year's AATC program covers the full software life cycle. We've got expert talks on design, serverless frameworks, testing, containerization, continuous delivery, infrastructure-as-code, operations, and much more. Oh, and this isn't only for our new apps. Most companies want to unlock new value from their legacy apps, and we've got a handful of talks about making that happen.
  2. Puts theory into practice. At this point, most of us know why we should iteratively build resilient, scalable software that users want to use. It's time to spend more time on how to do it. That's what we're after with AATC. For each session, our program committee considered how a session would help you be better at software. You'll leave AATC with a notebook full of ideas and fresh motivation to apply your new skills.
  3. Focuses on individual AND team performance. Yes, you should absolutely invest in yourself. But you're also investing in your team when you attend a conference. The AATC program focuses on individual practices, team practices, and organizational practices. It's about up-leveling everyone's skills. You'll learn about practices that help you do secure, agile systems at scale.
  4. No bias towards one technology or vendor. The sheer volume of new technology is overwhelming, isn't it? Your engineering practices have to take into account a lot of unique products. AATC isn't favored towards any one provider. This means that you get a great cross-section of established and emerging technology in our session list.

It's time to focus on you this year. Don't settle for online-only education. AATC offers you a unique chance to get out, mix it up with your peers, learn new things, and spend a few days with us in Boston. You won't regret it.

About the Author

Richard Seroter is a Senior Director of Product at Pivotal, with a master’s degree in Engineering from the University of Colorado. He’s also a 10-time Microsoft MVP for cloud, an instructor for developer-centric training company Pluralsight, the lead InfoQ.com editor for cloud computing, and author of multiple books on application integration strategies. Richard maintains a regularly updated blog on topics of architecture and solution design and can be found on Twitter as @rseroter.


This is an Agile Alliance community blog post. Opinions represented are personal and belong solely to the author. They do not represent opinion or policy of Agile Alliance.