Abstract/Description

Sometimes there just isn't enough testing time for all the testing we'd like to do as a team. For those testers stuck in a phased approach, testing can end up feeling like a bottleneck in the system, with testers constantly asking for more time or more help. Having experienced that team dynamic, I know that I can't do all of this testing alone and I wouldn't want to. Whole team testing reduces the time waiting for feedback and improves communication to deliver customer value sooner.

So let's say you live in this utopia of collaboration. Everybody tests! The unparalleled beauty of your shared understanding astounds everyone and satisfies your clients. You get more feedback earlier and from different perspectives. Okay, now I envy you. When can I move in? Or I guess I could just build my own little utopia right here. But where do I start?

Steps to reproduce:
1. Dispel the convenient myth that only testers test
2. Find an opening, some opportune moment to share the testing love
3. Review your results together (mini retro)
4. Iterate and improve (coaching your way to victory)
5. Facilitate testing activities but don't hoard them

During this session, we will draw upon the collective wisdom of the attendees to compare notes on challenges and solutions that we have experienced as well as walking through a case study of whole team testing.

Whole team testing: because teams who own testing have more confidence in the customer value of their results

Additional Resources

About the Speaker(s)

Senior software engineer working closely with product development team, a real test jumper. I help teams to craft more testable user stories. Testing teacher, unit and integration test review and advisement, exploratory testing coach. Exploratory tester (manual tester) and test automator using Javascript and Glance. Software testing speaker, workshop facilitator, author, and blogger.Claire Moss has always had a passion for writing, which might be a strange trait for a discrete mathematician, but that doesn’t stop her from blogging or writing testing articles. After working briefly as a software programmer during college, Claire signed on as a quality engineer after graduation. By now, Claire has been testing software for 14 years. When you find your calling, you never look back! You might say she’s a compulsive empiricist when it comes to software. Claire continues to use her evil powers for good on the job and on her blog.