Abstract/Description

The ninth principle from the Agile Manifesto states that technical excellence enhances agility, but when the codebase is ugly and the deadlines are tight, most teams don’t choose to refactor mercilessly, adopt TDD, or evaluate automated testing tools—unless they have the proper support. In our experience working with multiple teams in a single codebase, developers can feel victim to a legacy codebase if only a few people are writing clean code or refactoring; guiding them on how to decrease technical debt while delivering their projects helps "unstuck" their other agile practices. We will talk about the challenges we’ve seen with Product Owners, Managers, and Scrum Masters interacting with teams at various stages of agile+technical excellence and how a focus on technical practices sparked a wider interest in craftsmanship. Learn how can you influence the team towards the right practices while fostering their sense of ownership. Getting serious about technical excellence requires support from technical and non-technical roles, and we’ll share how we partnered as coaches to help an organization through a technical turnaround with some tips for others who need to do the same.

Additional Resources

About the Speaker(s)

Michael Rieser is an Technical Excellence Agile Coach. He enjoys sharing his technical understanding of software development. He authors and teaches courses, and delivers presentations on various aspects of software development at client sites, and conferences. He believes that the best software development practices are primarily governed by Agile values and principles, incorporate Lean Thinking, and at their core are iterative and incremental.

Allison Pollard helps people discover their agile instincts and develop their coaching abilities. As an agile coach with Improving in Dallas, Allison enjoys mentoring others to become great Scrum Masters and fostering communities that provide sustainability for agile transformations. In her experience, applying agile methods improves delivery, strengthens relationships, and builds trust between business and IT. A big believer in the power of community-based learning, she grew the DFW Scrum user group significantly over the five years she served as an organizer. Allison is also a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, a foodie, and proud glasses wearer.